TSLCPickles1This is a recipe I used 30 years ago when my children were little on the farm. They still fight over these pickles.   It is easy and the pickles are good.  So, if you have lots of cucumbers this year, this is a great way to preserve them. You don’t even seal the jars for these pickles.  They have a great taste, too.  I make them every year and divide the jars between my three children and myself.  Some years I get cheated!

4 1/2 quarts water
3 pints cider vinegar 5 percent
1 1/2 cups canning salt
2 teaspoons powdered alum
2 teaspoons yellow food coloring
Garlic cloves
Cucumbers, peeled and cut into spears
Bring first five ingredients to a boil in a large pot.   Peel and put raw cucumbers in jars.  Add one clove of garlic and one sprig of dill to each jar.  Pour enough of the boiling mixture into jars to cover cucumbers.  Screw on jar lids. Jars don’t have to be sealed.
Let jars sit for 10 to 14 days before serving.  Refrigerate before opening so pickles will be crisp.  Enjoy!
Note:  This makes about 6 quarts of liquid. It depends on how full you make your jars as to how many jars you will get from the recipe. I have never tried making them without peeling them. They will keep on the shelf for at least 3 or 4 months. I usually get about 8 or 9 quarts.  You can keep the liquid in the fridge and reheat if you don’t have enough cucumbers to use up all the liquid.  You could also cut the recipe in half to see if you like the pickles. The food coloring just makes for a prettier jar of pickles.
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  1. Tom Rutledge says:

    Really look good I think I’ll have the wife make me some as we both like dill pickles a lot But one question ? Will they keep longer if you seal them and refrigerate them?

  2. Do you have to sterilize the glass jars? I’ve never made pickles or any canning of any kind but I’d like to try these!

  3. thanks for this recipe…my husband loves dill pickles , so I am saving this for when my cucumbers are done in the garden….thanks again.

  4. Penny Ireland says:

    Going to try your dill pickles, do you peel all of the peeling off before cutting them in quarters?

  5. denise szostek says:

    thank you very much. I cant wait to give this a whirl.

  6. denise szostek says:

    what is alum?

  7. Will definitely be giving this a try as soon as my ‘cukes’ come in. Not processing has to give me a crisper pickle. Thanks.

  8. Patti Stites says:

    I am new to canning. So far I have just made jams and jellies, apple butter, peach butter etc. Would these keep longer if I put them in a water bath so they sealed? i love your postings…real food made with ingredients I actually have in the house.

  9. Can you seal them anyway?

  10. Edra Zittrauer says:

    Barb, I believe the recipe will make 12 quarts. I cut it in half and made 12 pints. I’d never used fresh dill before so I was a little unsure how much to use. I just put “some” in each jar so each jar will probably taste different. For my second batch I put the dill and garlic in the bottom of the jar before putting the cukes in. I sliced my cukes round since I didn’t copy the pic on my printed copy and they are just bite size. I couldn’t wait 10-14 days to try mine so I put a jar in the fridge for a few days and tasted them. They are really good but the next time I’ll cut down on the salt.

  11. How long will the jars of pickles keep if unrefrigerated (before opening to eat?)

  12. About how many jars do you get with the amounts of liquids that you’ve got in the recipe? Just curious… Could you make up the liquid in advance and refrigerate, then re-heat to use as needed? Since it’s not necessarily a recipe that requires sealing, this would be a good recipe for people who save their glass jars & corresponding lids thru the year…

    • I don’t remember exactly how many jars you get with the liquid but it does keep in the refrigerator and you can reheat it to make another batch. I only had a few cucumbers at a time last year and I just made my pickles using the already made up liquid.

    • I am curious…if they don’t require sealing, don’t they have to be refrigerated immediately? Won’t they spoil if not refrigerated?

      • Hi Sheila, They will keep unrefrigerated. I have never had a jar ruin on me. I guess since they are pickled that is why they keep. I am sure they would not keep indefinitely. They need to sit at least 10 to 14 days before eating and after that I just put one jar in the fridge at a time. I have my last jar in the fridge from last year now.

  13. Margaret Cloud says:

    Now this is my kind of canning, simple and they look good. I certainly am going to give this a try, thanks for sharing. Have a nice evening.

  14. Judy…what’s going on here. Are we tuned into each other or what? My post this morning is about canning and a pickle recipe…Love your recipe. I’ve never put food coloring in my pickles…I’ll try them. Balisha

  15. And I was wondering what I was going to do with all my cucumbers from the garden! I have most of those ingredients except for the canning salt, which shouldn’t be too hard to get. My family loves pickles so they should go quick!

  16. Hi, Judy. Thanks for this easy pickle recipe. We have volunteer cucumber plants in our garden this year and I don’t care for cucumbers (but I like pickles), so maybe this would be a good use for them.

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